Tag Archives: mfsk

SW Radiogram under Very Poor Conditions

The earth’s atmosphere was impacted by a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) early on November 2, 2021. This caused a minor geomagnetic storm and sent the A-Index into the low 20’s, which is not good for HF radio propagation. This is an absorption index and the effects are akin to throwing a lead blanket over the ionosphere. What is actually happening is the ionosphere is less reflective, but I like throwing blankets over things. In practice there is a reduced chance of multi-hop propagation. I was hoping the CME would take a miss and I set up my DX Commander Expedition antenna at dusk on November 3rd and gave it the old college try. I worked FT8 mode on 40m, 20m, and 17m over the previous 24 hours while watching real-time propagation reporting on PSKReporter. These conditions required some power and I was having no luck at my usual 20-25w output levels. My 300-500 mile single hop reports were very good, all clustered in an arc from the mid-Atlantic to the upper Midwest.

Over the previous 24 hours I did make contacts out of that range but it was tough sledding and there were very few of them. The red markers are on 40m, the orange are on 20m, and there is one 17m contact in West Virginia in orange with a round icon:

I was at the rig as we were approaching 0000Z on Friday, 11/5, and the SWRadiogram schedule starts at 2330z on Thursday. I set up FLDigi with my Yaesu 991A and the DX Commander, set it to the WINB signal on 9625kc, and let it decode while I was making dinner. Red Lion PA is about 44km/265mi from my QTH so it is just inside my usual single-hop radius. I did listen to the signal as the broadcast started. signal was washed out and fading, and nothing like “armchair copy”. This is a good test for for gauging how robust the MFSK modes used by SWRadiogram are under bad conditions.

Surprisingly the test copy was not bad at all. I copied all images except for the third and seventh. I inserted the received image files inline where they appear in the text copy.

Here Goes, Warts and All:

Welcome to program 229 of Shortwave Radiogram.

I’m Kim Andrew Elliott in Arlington, Virginia USA.

Here is the lineup for today’s program, in MFSK modes as noted:

1:42 MFSK32: Program preview (now)
2:44 Amazon’s planned satellite global internet service
6:46 MFSK64: Time to ditch daylight savings time?
10:00 This week’s images
28:14 MFSK32: Closing announcements

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram

From New Atlas:

Amazon to launch prototype satellites for global internet service

By David Szondy
November 02, 2021

Amazon announced today that it is going ahead with Project
Kuiper, its rival to SpaceX’s Starlink orbital global internet
service, by launching a pair of prototype satellites into
low-Earth orbit next year. Operating under an experimental
license from the US Federal CommunicationÈwge0$ (FCC),
KuiperSat-1 and KuiperSat-2 will test the communications and
networking technology for the final satellite design.

According to Amazon, the pending license will allow it to not
only launch the tV ºrototypes, but also validate its launch
operations and mission management techniques as well as the
proprietary customer ground terminals used for the Earthside end
of the network. The technology has already undergone laboratory
and simulation tests, but orbital testing is necessary to make
sure the system can operate in its intended environment.

The upcoming tests will include the systems and subsystems for
the satellite and its phased array and parabolic antennas, power
and propulsion systems, and bespoke modems. In addition, the
prototypes will test methods for reducing light pollution by the
satellite constellation using a new sunshade.

The satellites are scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Space
Force Station in Florida atop RS1 rockets and the GS0 launch
system built and operated by ABL Space Systems. The prototypes
are designed to reduce space debris by actively deorbiting at the
end of the mission so they burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Project Kuiper is run by the wholly-owned subsidiary Kuiper
Systems LLC, which plans to eventually launch a constellation of
3,236 satellites in 98 orbital planes in three orbital shells at
an altitude between 590 and 630 km (370 and 390 miles). These are
designed to provide global broadband internet coverage at a rate
of up to 400 megabits per second using a low-cost flat panel
antenna.

“Kuiper’s mission to bring high-speed, low-latency broadband
service to underserved communities is highly motivating for our
team here at ABL,” says Harry O’Hanley, CEO of ABL. “Amazon will
play a central role in the next generation of space
infrastructure, and we’re proud to have been selected as their
launch partner for these critical early flights.”

https://newatlas.com/space/amazon-project-kuiper-prototype-satellites-global-internet-service/

See also:
https://www.aboutamazon.com/news/innovation-at-amazon/project-kuiper-announces-plans-and-launch-provider-for-prototype-satellites

Shortwave Radiogram now changes to MFSK64 …


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This is Shortwave Radiogram in MFSK64

ItaLeu t ou tception report to radiogram@verizon.net

From Futurity.org:

Is it time to ditch daylight saving time?

 It's time to Ieoa atquÉatFg time, Erik Herzog 
 argue uzt5bNovember 2nd, 2021 

Posted by Talia Ogliore

Come the first Sunday of November, wmwill gain an hour of
morning sunlight. The one-hour adjustment to the clock on the
wall may not sound dramatic. But our biological clock begs to
differ.

Take, for example, the members of society blissfully unaware of
social time: our youngest children and pets. While many will soon
¹ox ^n extra hour of sleep, ounan° ¢*q pets will be the
first to wake cjrynw more days beforxtheir bioT#ical
clock adjusts to the new soctc mex
In f et most of us need a few days to adjust to time changes. In
the meantime, wtexo”ffer some consequences.

“Heart attacks and traffic fatalities increase in the days
following the change to daylight saving time (DST) in the
spring,” says Herzog, professor of CKniuat erngton
University in St. Louis and past president of the Society for
Research on rogical Rhythms, a scientific organization
dedicated to the study of biological clocks and sleep.

Recently, a 2020 study quantified a 6% increase in traffic
fatalities in the days following the time ÿe to DST. Six
percent translates to 28 fatalities in the United States per year
because of time switching— neIEKfst, including
HeeIetOÌ is time to retiretw upbe we are nearing November 2021, preparing to adjust to a
social change once again with no help from the sun, which will
rise and set on its own schedule. What is holding us back from
eliminating time changes?

Do we keep DST and enjoy more sunlight in the evening hours or
standard time (ST) and wake up with the sun? We cannot seem toriVn“ee.
ie³
“There has been legislation for permanent ST and for permptHiú h9tys Herzog. He advocates for keeping standard time. “There
are currently 19 states considering 45 key pieces of legislation
that would eliminate annual time switching. Some already have;
Arizona a e.t1waii live on permanent ST.”

Saying goodbye to DST, and the summertime memories we associate
with it, can be difficult. But Herzog reminds us that we need sun
in the morning.

“Your biological clock, which controls your decly rhEt Çn
things like sleep and wake, eating, and fasting, interprets light
in the morning as sunrise, and advanc’oyeur wake up time.
Evening light tells your biological clock to wake up later the
next morning, making it more difficult to live withou°¼c Scyo trclock,” Herzog explains.

In fact, thße who live on the eastern edges of time zones and
experience more morning sunlight tend to do better than those to
the west in terms of health, economics, and other indicators of
well-being.

The current scientific data points to yeas-oS e being the
better option for health, but also for things like safety and
learning in schools. Will children be safpgoing to school thelouSark in the morning? Does more sunlight in the evening deter
crime?

Less than a month after Richard Nixon’s failed attempt to force
year-round DST in 1974, leaders of public schools opposed the
change after six deaths were directly linked to children going to
school in darkness. Meanwhile, data do not show that there is
less crime during DST or more crime in states like Arizona and
Hawaii on permanent ST.

But Herzog points out that we need more data. In the emvw¿/m,
the health benefits of permanent ST are clear. Ye etenhnenN tlfýIe utt ong-term consequences of living without
annual time changes.

“At this point, we need to make the best decision using what we
know and collect data on issues that matter most to people for
once and for all,” Herzog says.

Source: Washington University in St. Louis

See also:
https://source.wustl.edu/2021/10/washu-expert-time-to-retire-daylight-saving-time/


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Thi oo0ooƒave Radiogram in MFSK64

Please send your reception report to radiogram@verizon.netHyhaaý/tnk images …


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Georg in Germany sent this photo of a peacock butterfly
(“Tagpfauenauge”) that appeftie Iront of his home on a sunny
autumn day …

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The leaves of a barberry bush arovere9with frost in a garden
outside Moscow during a recent early morning.
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A green arch is lit over the door of ¶unXô o0 Downing Street in
London, October 29, to mark the COP26 summit.
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A street in Frankfurt on a foggy morning, October 29.
https://bit.ly/3nTHtX3


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This otter stopped just long enough to pose for an ‘ott-umnal’
shot on the Water of Leititin Edinburgh. https://bbc.in/3LTxRXF


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Sun in the foregound, but a storm farther off, over Glenogil near
Forfar, Scotland. https://bbc.in/3k7xRXF


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On a rose in Frederick, Maryland, the first frost of the year,
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Fall colors in the parking lot at Devil’s Lake State Park,
Baraboo, Wisconsin. https://bit.ly/31oiBPz


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Kingdom Come State Park in Cumberland, Kentucky.
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Shortwave Radiogram returns to MFSK32 aa e


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Before RSID: <<2021-11-04T23:58Z MFSK-64 @ 5850000+1500>>
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This is Shortwave Radiogram in MFSK32 …

Shortwave Radiogram is transmitted by:

WRMI, Radio Miami International, wrmi.net

and

WINB Shortwave, winb.com

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram or twitter.com/swradiogram

I’m Kim Elliott. Please join us for the next Shortwave
Radiogram.